House of General Charles G. Loring
Prides Crossing, Massachusetts
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Vincent J. Scully: Sterling Professor Emeritas, History of Art, Yale University, and Stephen R.Holt, Architect, Yale '72

Dear Stephen,

I am delighted to hear that your many years of faithful care for the numerous and very distinguished Shingle Style houses in your area have now borne special fruit thanks to Historic New England. The acceptance of William Ralph Emerson's Charles G. Loring House as one of their study house properties is very good news indeed.

It is remarkable that such a house has come down to us intact, with all its furnishings, and will now be available for public enjoyment and serious study. I hope that all of us who have already benefitted from it in many ways will now support its transition to the care of Historic New England, as you, who have done so much to ensure its preservation, have asked us to do.
Sincerely,
Vincent Scully

Stephen Roberts Holt, AIA, Yale March’72 is presently overseeing the preservation of numerous historic North Shore estates, as well as designing many new projects throughout New England.

He is a descendent of the builder of the first house in Manchester, Massachusetts and the great grandson of Oliver T. Roberts the builder of the General Charles G. Loring house. It was his pleasure to introduce Vincent Scully to Sam Codman and his house.

 

Stephen Holt Architects

 

 

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Stephen Holt, Architects

Vincent J. Scully: Sterling Professor Emeritas, History of Art, Yale University, and Stephen R.Holt, Architect, Yale '72

Dear Stephen:

I am delighted to hear that your many years of faithful care for the numerous and very distinguished Shingle Style houses in your area have now borne special fruit thanks to Historic New England. The acceptance of William Ralph Emerson's Charles G. Loring House as one of their study house properties is very good news indeed.

It is remarkable that such a house has come down to us intact, with all its furnishings, and will now be available for public enjoyment and serious study. I hope that all of us who have already benefitted from it in many ways will now support its transition to the care of Historic New England, as you, who have done so much to ensure its preservation, have asked us to do.

Robert A.M. Stern: Dean, J.M. Hoppin Professor of Architecture,
Yale University School of Architecture

Dear Stephen,

I am thrilled to learn that William Ralph Emerson's Loring House is not only in superb condition but also on its way to being preserved for the future. I am embarrassed to say that I have not visited the house - but I know it very well from its publication in books as a result of which it has had a profound influence on my work. Because of the simplicity of its plan, the miracles of its detailing inside and out and most of all its extraordinarily sympathetic siting, the Loring house is a masterpiece.

I salute you for your efforts on behalf of the Emerson tradition and promise you any support I can deliver to provide for the house's future.

My best, Robert A.M. Stern

Robert Campbell: Pulitzer Prize Winner and
Boston Globe Architecture Critic

"A visit to the Loring House is a voyage into a bygone age. The Loring heaves itself upwards out of the coast like a natural eruption. The shingles reflect the weather of the New England Coast: they wrap the house tightly, like a cloak awaiting a nor'easter."

"The Shingle Style, like many great styles of architecture, lived a surprisingly brief life. All the more reason to save and study this remaining masterpiece."

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